I work as a self-employed editor, translator, writer and teacher, in Montréal.

Since 2000, I've edited, translated and localised for the Canadian market hundreds of student books and teacher guides. I've worked in core-curriculum subjects such as French as a Second Language, Language Arts, History, Geography and Social Studies, at both the elementary and secondary levels. Some of the publishers I've worked with include Scholastic, Nelson and Chenelière.

I write about Québécois French on OffQc. I publish new posts there several times a week; over 1100 posts have been put online so far, as well as 100 videos transcribed in French.

I was mentioned in the media in this CBC interview: Freeing French: Felix Polesello, Québec's language ambassador, in this National Post article: What francophones hear when the party leaders speak French and in this Atlas Obscura piece: The delightful perversity of Québec's Catholic swear words.

I've written five guides to learning the spoken variety of Québécois French, all of which can be purchased online here. These guides have been bought by learners of French all over the world.

My working languages are English, French, Italian, Spanish and Latin. I live in Montréal in a multilingual neighbourhood where speaking these languages on a regular basis is possible.

I can get by in Turkish (on good days). I've spent extended amounts of time in Istanbul over the past fifteen years and had the privilege of living and working there in 2003. I return periodically to visit.

I'm a member of the Royal Heraldry Society of Canada. I'm working on a multilingual blog about blazonry in Italian, English, French and Latin called Araldica Polesello. One of the things in particular that I'm working on is creating a standardised vocabulary and style of blazonry in Latin.

I've worked (and continue to work) under both the names Kevin and Felix, and you'll find my work signed with either one. That said, amongst those who know me personally, I very often go by my surname Polesello.

Polesello is an Italian name. It derives from the name of Italy's longest river — the Po — which runs across the northern part of the country. To pronounce it, say poh-leh-zell-loh, with the stress on the penultimate (second-last) syllable.

Overview

Names I work under
  • Felix Polesello
  • Kevin Polesello
Where I am online
My main areas of interest
  • Québécois French
  • Latin
  • Heraldry
What I do
  • Write
  • Edit
  • Translate
  • Teach
I've worked with
  • Scholastic
  • Nelson
  • Chenelière
I'm a member of
  • Royal Heraldry Society of Canada
My working languages
  • English
  • French
  • Italian
  • Spanish
  • Latin